Art Flick Chapter Trout Unlimited

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Art Flick Chapter Trout Unlimited

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                                                                                                                                                                    Artwork Donated to TU by James Prosek

 

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                                   "FROM WHERE I STAND..."

                                                            ~  February 2017  ~ 


 

The view I have of conservation and the outdoor ethic is a very personal one based on years of education, experience, and the interaction with others & the natural world.  Most of us base our views on similar things; our perspectives are also founded on certain truths and prejudices. Over time, we become jaded, dated, and stale. This makes it tough for us to truly keep an open mind and listen to new ideas. The old saying goes “With age comes wisdom…” that could lead to a false sense of security.  Almost as bad as “well, that’s how we always did it”
 
Let us first explore ethics and the outdoor ethic and not let our beliefs get in the way. Wait a second!  They have to be the same or do they?  I can explain the difference in a simple example, I like to wear green shirts, I believe green is a great color!  Okay, I get it you believe green is a good color. Ethically, if you found a green shirt in the store with no price tag and pulled the price tag off another shirt that was on sale that would be okay.  After all you believe green is good and after all they did charge a pretty penny for it.  The stores are making big money selling green shirts I should get a discount?
 
Most would know right from wrong and the outdoor ethic is the same. Seasons close for a reason; size and species limitations are for a reason. Leaving no trace is not up for debate.  Culling a bag to keep a larger fish or fishing after a limit is taken are all unethical practices. The folks managing the outdoors make decisions.  We may not agree with all of them, but we must abide by them when they become final. As members of TU, we are periodically asked for our opinions on policy by the Town or DEC. If we do not respond then we acquiesce to whatever changes are proposed. The time to question changes are before they happen, I encourage all to make their voice heard.
 
The news of the draw down at “Lower Lake” in Yaphank is a great place to start. At our last meeting, it was received with mostly positive comments. The Town of Yaphank I am sure would like to hear from our members who either agree or disagree. The result of less dredging and the resulting less sediment flowing down stream is a Positive in my opinion.  Having the stream revert to its original bed would be a great step forward.  Would there be an impact by the displacement of fish that inhabit the lake is a valid concern.  Most will seek out safer waters or succumb to natural forces.  The fear of bass eating trout downstream could be a concern to some; having observed the bass that occupied below the “C Dam” and at “E” and “G” sections. My observations were that the bass attacked fish under stress; yes, they ate trout that were hooked. They were attracted to the struggle, not the fish. I observed no bass randomly eating fish as they lie in the feeding lanes. They may actually compete for food. It is after all a predator prey world.  Natural forces are not out of our control, nor should they ever be.
 
February’s meeting is on the “Art of the Fly Tier”, we have many guest tiers scheduled to appear. Come down and observe the techniques employed, and ask question.  If you already tie, maybe you can bring your stuff and show what you can tie. Our meeting will be held the first Monday in February at 7:30PM, Town of Brookhaven Recreation Center on Montauk Highway in Bluepoint, New York.

  

 Tight lines!!

         Tom Walsh,  President

 

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  ******CONGRATULALTIONS GO TO LYLE FINGER... WINNER OF THE DECEMBER RAFFLE DRAWING OF THE DOUG ERNST CRAFTED BAMBOO FLY ROD... WE HOPE THAT IT BRINGS MANY ENJOYABLE HOURS A STREAM IN 2017!  THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE CAUSE.******

           ******FOR 2017 ESTEEMED LONG ISLAND BAMBOO FLY ROD MAKER & CHAPTER FRIEND CHUCK NEUNER HAS GRACIOUSLY DONATED ONE OF HIS FINELY CRAFTED "C. P. NEUNER" SPLIT BAMBOO FLY RODS FOR A CHAPTER RAFFLE FUND RAISING EVENT... PLEASE STAY TUNED FOR COMING ROD & RAFFLE DETAILS****** 



  
Weekly Photos...   

     What better way to ward off a case of Winter's Cabin Fever than to spend an early Saturday morning fly tying with old & new friends.  Come join the AFTU regulars for a session of fly tying... no experience needed, just a desire to learn a new art form... and help fill your fly boxes for the up-coming season

              AFTU Group Leader, Doug Ernst, demonstrates weaving a floss nymph pattern for the fly pattern of the week.  
      


 

 

Newsflash

 

 

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*Angling Humorist   >>>Hank Patterson Explains TU To Some Newbies<<<

*01/08/2017- Added .pdf copy of the January 2017  newsletter  "The Red Quill".